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Collections Available for Research

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The White House Health Care Interdepartmental Working Group
In January, 1993, the White House Health Care Interdepartmental Working Group was created as part of President Clinton's health care reform initiative. The Interdepartmental Working Group was composed of participants from both the public and private sectors, including academics, health care professionals, state and federal officials, and public policy advocates. The Working Group studied existing national health care systems, and developed various proposals for health care reform. These recommendations were presented to the Task Force on National Health Care Reform chaired by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton.

The information and proposals provided by the Interdepartmental Working Group enabled the Task Force to advise the President on the formulation of a comprehensive national health care reform package. Click here for finding aid.




Master Set- White House Press Briefings
A series consisting of original copies of White House Press Briefings, arranged chronologically. This series includes press briefings issued by the White House from January 1993 through January 2001.
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Master Set- White House Press Releases
A series consisting of original copies of White House Press Releases, arranged chronologically. This series includes every press release issued by the White House from January 1993 through January 2001.
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Press Release Subject File
A series consisting of White House Press Releases arranged alphabetically by subject. This series includes press release issued by the White House from January 1993 through January 2001.
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The Presidential Advisory Commission on Holocaust Assets
Coming into existence in 1998, the Presidential Advisory Commission on Holocaust Assets in the United States (PACHA, aka PCHA) was charged with investigating what happened to the assets of victims of the Holocaust that ended up in the possession of the United States Federal government. The organization consisted of 21 members—eight private citizens appointed by the President, one representative each from the Departments of State, Justice, Army, and Treasury appointed by the President, two members from the House of Representatives appointed by the Speaker, two members from the House of Representatives appointed by the minority leader, two members from the Senate appointed by the majority leader, two members from the Senate appointed by the minority leader, and the Chairperson of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council. Edgar Bronfman was selected as Chairman of the PACHA, with Kenneth Klothen serving as Executive Director. The final report of the Commission, “Plunder and Restitution: Findings and Recommendations of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Holocaust Assets in the United States and Staff Report” was submitted to President Clinton in December 2000.

Research constituted the heart of PCHA’s work. Committees on art and cultural property, gold, and non-gold financial property were established with recognized experts Jonathan Petropoulos, Marc Masurovsky, and Helen Junz, respectively, serving as so-called “team leaders.” Outside authorities critiqued the reports and papers composed by committee members.

The first fifteen series of the collection are composed mostly of photocopied federal records. These records were reproduced at the National Archives and Records Administration by commission members for their research. The records relate to Holocaust assets created between the mid 1930’s and early 1950’s by a variety of U. S. Government agencies and foreign sources. Topics covered by these records include the recovery of confiscated art and cultural property; the repatriation of gold and other financial assets; and the investigation of events surrounding capture of the Hungarian Gold Train at the close of World War II. These files contain memoranda, correspondence, inventories, reports, and secondary source material related to the final disposition of art and cultural property, gold, and other financial assets confiscated during the Holocaust.

The next series of the records of the PCHA deals with the issue of reparations. These records are comprised in large measure of applications for restitution of pieces or art (many of them in a foreign language). Generally speaking, claims were filed on behalf of countries, not individuals. Along with these records, detailed lists of paintings and other similar items believed to be stolen figure prominently in the remainder of the series.

The next series of records revolves around the activities of Chase National Bank during World War II. These documents include telegrams, court proceedings, memos, correspondence, and FBI field reports dealing with illegal financial transactions engaged in by Anton Smit & Co., Inc., and the intricacies of the rueckwanderer program. In both matters Chase National Bank, in essence, aided and abetted the Nazis. For instance, in the case of Anton Smit & Co., Inc., bank officials looked the other way as the business violated the Trading with the Enemy Act and Neutrality Act.

The rueckwanderer program was a scheme whereby Germans living in the United States would receive a financial incentive for depositing American dollars in banks in their homeland. Specifically, investors were promised twice the value of German marks for every dollar deposited. Chase helped promote this plan by employing a number of small travel agencies and exchange bureaus to operate in German communities throughout the United States. The German government wanted only Aryans in the rueckwanderer program and went out of its way to exclude Jews from becoming investors. Hitler and the Nazis achieved their desired aim by issuing “certificates of unobjectionability” to those individuals interested in putting money into their project. These certificates were granted to Aryans only. In addition, a sizable proportion of the marks earmarked for investors were extorted from Germany’s Jews. By imposing outrageous taxes and forcing Jews to sell homes and businesses at a fraction of their worth, the Third Reich succeeded in raising money for the rueckwanderer program.

The next series constitutes the administrative files of the PCHA. These records include minutes, staff reports, and e-mails that describe the day-to-day activities of the Commission. Each major meeting of the Commission is documented in detail from its preparation and logistics all the way to the remarks made and actions taken by members. Staff retreats and public hearings also receive a considerable amount of attention in the records.

The final series of the PCHA, Art and Cultural Property Theft, includes drafts of chapters, reports, correspondence, newspaper clippings, fact sheets, researcher notes, and findings and recommendations. These documents cover such topics as the Hungarian Gold Train, the possible acquisition by the Library of Congress of valuable Jewish books stolen by the Nazis, and the looting by American military personnel of paintings and other similar objects of art.

One of the great mysteries of World War II, the Hungarian Gold Train provided an example of the failure of the United States to follow through on its restitution policy. In May 1945, American forces captured a train in the town of Werfen, Austria. On this train were valuables – gold, jewelry, paintings, and other treasures – confiscated from the Hungarian Jewish population and sent out of the country by the pro-Nazi government in an effort to avoid the rapidly approaching Soviet army. Referred to as the “Gold Train,” the mystery concerns what happened to the works of art that wound up in the hands of American authorities when they seized the train in Austria. The general restitution policy of the United States required the return of cultural assets to the country of origin. Yet in this instance more than 1,100 paintings owned by Hungarian Jews ended up in the custody of the Austrian government. Moreover, there is evidence American officials refused to permit leaders of the Hungarian Jewish community access to the Gold Train to identify personal property. Finally, there are allegations that American military officers took assets from the Gold Train to furnish their lodgings in Austria and that jewelry and similar items from the train were sold through the army exchange. Click here for finding aid.



Domestic Policy Council, Carol Rasco, Subject File
As the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy, Carol Rasco headed up the Domestic Policy Council from 1993 to 1997. Her staff included her Chief of Staff, an Executive Assistant, a Scheduler, two Deputy Assistants, a Special Assistant, eight Senior Policy Analysts, and four Staff Assistants. The records series of the Domestic Policy Council (DPC), Carol Rasco Subject Files, reflects the wide range of domestic policy issues Rasco and her staff dealt with on a daily basis. These issues included health care, education, violence and crime prevention, employment, state and local communities, civil rights, Americorps, housing and homelessness, Empowerment Zones, and the arts. The records include memos, letters, reports, meeting notes and agendas, pamphlets, handwritten notes, newspaper clippings, schedules, and magazine and journal articles. Rasco's files include memos to/from DPC staff, White House staff, President Clinton and Vice-President Gore, and various Cabinet members. The files also contain correspondence to/from other agencies who communicated regularly with DPC such as Health and Human Services (HHS), Veterans Affairs (VA), and the Department of Education. The records also include correspondence from public/private organizations, as well as individuals, on various domestic issues. The health care issues contained in the records include AIDS (1993 and 1994), children's health, disabilities, drug and alcohol abuse, Medicaid and state Medicaid waivers, and Medicare. In addition to topics of prevention and treatment, the AIDS files also contain resumes and letters of support for various applicants in the appointment process to the Presidential HIV/AIDS Advisory Council.
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Domestic Policy Council, Bruce Reed, Welfare Reform (1993-2001) Subject File

When President Clinton entered the White House, he soon established an interagency group, the White House Working Group on Welfare Reform, Family Support, and Independence (1993-1994), in order to carry out his campaign promise “to end welfare as we know it.”  The Working Group was co-chaired by Bruce Reed, Deputy Assistant (later Assistant) to the President for Domestic Policy (1993-1997) and Director of the Domestic Policy Council (1997-2001), and two senior staff members from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), David Ellwood and Mary Jo Bane.  The Working Group contained employees from various government agencies, bureaus, and offices (HHS, Treasury, Office of Management and Budget…).  The Working Group presented their proposal to the President in the spring of 1994, and the Work and Responsibility Act of 1994 was introduced to Congress in June of that year.  After several versions, many changes, two vetoes, and a number of titles, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) was signed by President Clinton in August 1996.  Bruce Reed, Welfare Reform Series consists of four subseries: two subject files (one large and one small), specs/drafts of the Working Group's proposal from 1993-1994, and miscellaneous briefing books, binders, and reports.  The Welfare Reform files include material pertaining to legislative strategy, analysis of state plans, child support, speeches, rollout of the Working Group's proposal, and various drafts of welfare reform bills authored by the Working Group, Congress, and public/private organizations.  The files contain incoming correspondence, reports and articles, memos, handwritten notes, legislative bills, and various printed material.  Also included are memos to the President prepared by Bruce Reed, other White House staff, and various governmental agencies (primarily HHS) and memos between members of the Working Group, all concerning welfare reform.  Other documents include background information for welfare events, hearings, and meetings, Working Group agendas and notes, talking points, testimony and briefing books before House and Senate committees, financing ideas and costs, polls, vetoes, welfare case histories, and news clippings.  The collection also contains material related to the granting of welfare waivers in a number of states, most prominently Wisconsin.  In addition to information about the efforts to pass White House and Congressional welfare reform bills, there is also material about the effects of the final bill, the PRWORA, in memos, letters, and reports originating from the White House, HHS, and nongovernmental entities.  The series also contains various publications about welfare reform, authored by federal and private organizations.  The series is divided into two parts: Bruce Reed's welfare reform files from 1993-2001 (a large subject file) and Reed's welfare reform files from 1993-1994 (a small subject file, specs/drafts of the Working Group's proposal, and miscellaneous reports and publications). Click here for finding aid.


Clinton Administration History Project

The records of the Clinton Administration History Project consist of the histories of the Central Intelligence Agency, the Council of Economic Advisors, the Department of Commerce, the Department of the Interior, the Department of Defense, the Corporation for National Service, the Council on Environmental Quality, the Department of Justice, the Domestic Policy Council, the Department of Education, the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the General Services Administration, the Department of Health & Human Services, the Department of Housing & Urban Development, the Department of Labor, the National Economic Council, the Office of Management & Budget, the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the Office of Personnel Management, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, the Office of the Vice President, the Small Business Administration, the Social Security Administration, the Department of State, the Department of Transportation, the Department of the Treasury, the Agency for International Development, the Department of Agriculture, the United States Trade Representative, and the Department of Veterans’ Affairs. Altogether this collection contains the histories of 32 agencies or departments.
These papers describe in detail the accomplishments of President Clinton and his advisors for the period 1993-2001. Generally speaking, each organization associated with the enterprise submitted a narrative history along with supporting documents. These narrative accounts primarily are overviews of the various missions, special projects, and accomplishments of the agencies. The supplementary records include substantive memos, press releases, briefing papers, and publications illustrated with photos and charts. For example, the supplementary records of the Department of the Treasury include a considerable amount of substantive correspondence between Secretary Lloyd Bentsen and his subordinates dealing with the issue of health care reform. On the other hand, the supplementary papers of the histories of the Departments of Commerce and Interior consist almost entirely of publications.

The narrative accounts associated with the Clinton Administration History Project were written as a result of a directive from White House Chief of Staff, John Podesta. Following an example set by the Johnson Administration, Podesta and Clinton thought all major federal agencies and departments should submit a formal history detailing their respective achievements. They believed that these administrative histories would serve as a valuable research tool for the fundamental operations of the Clinton Presidency.Click here for finding aid.


Domestic Policy Council, Bruce Reed, Crime Series

The Crime Series is divided by date into two subject files (1993-1997 and 1997-2001) and thereunder alphabetically. The files include material pertaining to the Omnibus Crime Act of 1994, costs and financing of the 1994 Act, Congressional conference drafts of the 1994 Act, and results of the 1994 Act; the 100,000 COPS program; various gun issues and topics; negotiations with the gun industry and settlement in 2000 with Smith & Wesson; the Brady Bill; the Racial Justice Act; the 1999 Gun Show Bill; victims’ rights; school violence; and habeas reform. The files contain incoming correspondence, reports and articles, memos, handwritten notes, schedules, and various printed material. Also, in the Crime files, are memos to the President prepared by Bruce Reed, other White House staff, and various governmental agencies, all concerning crime. Other documents include background information for crime events and meetings, agendas and notes, talking points, testimony and briefing books, news clippings, and speeches by the President and his staff. Click here for finding aid.


Domestic Policy Council, Bruce Reed, Education Series

The Education Series is divided alphabetically and primarily covers the years 1997 thru 2000. The files include material pertaining to national standards and testing; the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and the 1999 efforts to reauthorize the Act; 100,000 teachers and class size; charter schools and vouchers; education events and forums; social promotion; Goals 2000; HOPE Scholarships; Pell Grants; the Education Flexibility Partnership Act of 1999 (Ed-flex); education funding and budgets; and various school and teacher issues. The files contain incoming correspondence, reports and articles, memos, polls, handwritten notes, hard copies of emails, schedules, and various printed material. Also, in the Education files, are memos to the President prepared by Bruce Reed, other White House staff (particularly Mike Cohen, a Domestic Policy Council education policy assistant), and various governmental agencies, all concerning education. Other documents include background information for education events and meetings, agendas and notes, talking points, testimony and briefing material, news clippings, drafts of legislative bills, press releases, and speeches by the President and and his staff. Click here for finding aid.


The Federal Records of the President’s Council on Sustainable Development

The President’s Council on Sustainable Development (PCSD) was established on June 29, 1993, by Executive Order 12852. The PCSD, a federal advisory commission, was composed of members from the public and private sectors who represented industrial, environmental, governmental, and not-for-profit organizations with experience relating to matters of sustainable development. Sustainable development encompassed Health and the Environment, Economic Prosperity, Equity, Conservation of Nature, Stewardship, Sustainable Communities, Civic Engagement, Population, and International Responsibility. The council advised the President on matters involving sustainable development and recommended a national sustainable development action strategy. The Council’s last meeting was held in February of 1999, and the Council’s charter expired in June of that same year.

This collection of federal records consists of five series. The first series is correspondence between the PCSD’s Executive Director and Co-Chairs, council members, and the public. This series also includes the Executive Director’s schedules, appointments, and calendars. The second series contains briefing materials, transcripts, minutes, debriefings, agendas, logistics, and public comments all related to Council meetings. In addition, this series includes the meetings of the Strategic Planning Group, Visioning Meetings, and various ancillary meetings. The third series includes speeches, press releases and kits, and information about public outreach (including the Kodak Project). The fourth series contains material related to the Council awards program, which recognized outstanding initiatives in sustainable development. The fifth series consists of PCSD reports and publications, including the report submitted to the President in March 1996, “Sustainable America: A New Consensus.”
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The Council of Economic Development Congressional Released Climate Change Documents

The Council of Economic Advisors (CEA) provides the President with economic analysis and advice on the development and implementation of domestic and international economic policy issues.

This series is currently the only group of CEA records open for research. This series is named Climate Change Documents, and it includes photocopies of research materials concerning climate change, provided in response to a Congressional Document Request. Materials within the series include photocopied publications, news clippings, press releases, memos, and correspondence. Click here for finding aid.


The Federal Records of the President’s Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in the Health Care Industry

The President’s Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in the Health Care Industry was created by President Clinton through Executive Order 13017 on March 26, 1997. The Commission advised the President on changes occurring in the health care system and recommended measures to protect the quality of health care for workers and consumers. The Commission consisted of four subcommittees: Consumer Rights, Protections, and Responsibilities; Quality Measurement; Creating a Quality Improvement Environment; and Roles and Responsibilities of Public and Private Purchases an Quality Oversight Organizations.

This collection consists of three series related to the plenary and subcommittee meetings of the Commission. The first series consist of verbatim transcripts of the proceedings of the Commission and subcommittee meetings and are arranged chronologically. The second series consist of briefing books that contain minutes from each public meeting of the Commission and subcommittees, background papers, draft chapters of the Commission’s reports, and selected correspondence from interested parties or Commissioners. The third series includes publications of the Commission’s final reports, including the Consumer Bill of Rights. Click here for finding aid.


Federal Records - President’s Advisory Board on Race - PR/Media Series

The PR/Media series holds speeches and talking points for presentations, media requests, press releases, press packages, transcripts from recorded appearances (including the President’s appearance on News Hour with Jim Lehrer, concerning the President’s Initiative on Race, or PIR), and general information about the PIR.
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Federal Records - President’s Advisory Board on Race -Programs and Forums Series

The Programs and Forums Series contains correspondence, memorandums, background materials, organizational brochures, and notes concerning forums and programs that shared the same goals as the President’s Initiative on Race (PIR). Programs included the Youth Project, Campus Week, and the Days of Dialogue. This series holds information about the Corporate Forums, which gave businesses the opportunity to discuss strategies to create a racially diversified work place. Click here for finding aid.


Federal Records - President’s Advisory Board on Race - Miscellaneous Series

The Miscellaneous Series holds various President’s Initiative on Race (PIR) files, PIR event material, and Judith Winston’s, the executive director, files. This series contains correspondence, memorandums, background materials, public service announcement information, internal strategies, project goals, meeting notes, and event calendars.
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Federal Records - President’s Advisory Board on Race - Meetings Series

The Meetings Series holds correspondence, preparation, meeting notes, and feedback for scheduled Advisory Board meetings. These meetings were open to the local community and held in Denver, San Jose, Akron, Fairfax, and Phoenix. This series includes materials from the ESPN Town Hall Meeting. The Meetings Series holds two subseries, Transcripts and Transcripts & Background. The Transcripts Subseries holds transcripts from open and closed Advisory Board meetings. These files are arranged alphabetically by meeting title. The Transcripts & Background Subseries contains the transcripts and background material for the open Advisory Board meetings.
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Federal Records - President’s Advisory Board on Race - Reports Series

The Reports Series has been divided into two subseries, Report Drafts and Weekly Reports to POTUS. The Report Drafts Subseries contains drafts of the “Report of the Advisory Board of the President’s Initiative on Race.” Drafts include comments and remarks by President’s Initiative on Race (PIR) staff and Advisory Board members. The Weekly Reports to POTUS Subseries holds memorandums written to the President and the Advisory Board from the executive director of the PIR, Judith Winston. The reports include Advisory Board and PIR weekly activities. Click here for finding aid.


Federal Records - President’s Advisory Board on Race – Correspondence

In June 1997, the President’s Advisory Board on Race was established by Executive Order 13050 as part of President Clinton’s Initiative on Race (PIR). The PIR was an effort to prepare the country to live as one America in the 21st century. Advisory Board members included: John Hope Franklin, Linda Chavez-Thompson, Suzan D. Johnson Cook, Thomas Kean, Angela E. Oh, Robert Thomas, and William F. Winter. The Advisory Board advised the President on matters involving race and racial reconciliation. After submitting its final report to the President, One America in the 21st Century: Forging a New Future, the Board terminated on September 30, 1998. As a result of the report and building on the efforts of the PIR, the President established the White House Office on the President’s Initiative for One America.

The Correspondence Series contains four subseries: [PIR Correspondence], PIR Correspondence, Invitations, and Administrative Correspondence. The [PIR Correspondence] Subseries, was placed in brackets because much of the correspondence (including resumes, letters from interested public, and correspondence between Advisory Board members and PIR staff) is addressed to Judith A. Winston, the executive director of the PIR Winston received correspondence at the Office of the General Counsel early in the history of the PIR. The PIR Correspondence Subseries is much like its bracketed predecessor, however this subseries holds more routine correspondence including mail logs that were kept by Winston, and standard thank you letters sent by the executive director. The Invitations Subseries holds invitations submitted to the PIR by organizations, colleges, and businesses, often requesting the presence of an Advisory Board member or PIR staff at an event or lecture concerning race. The Administrative Correspondence Subseries is organized alphabetically and includes letters from the public concerning racial reconciliation and correspondence from VIPs to PIR staff and Advisory Board members. Click here for finding aid.


Domestic Policy Council - Stephen Warnath, Senior Policy Analyst Civil Rights Series

The Civil Rights Series is divided by subject alphabetically. The majority of the files date 1993 - 1996. The files include material pertaining to the Civil Rights Working Group; Affirmative Action; English Only; Confirmation Briefing Materials for DOJ and EEOC nominees; Age Discrimination in Employment Act; Employment Non-Discrimination Act of 1994; Federal Employees Fairness Act; Religious Freedom Restoration Act; Consolidated Guidelines for Harassment; Church Burnings; Child Pornography; Budget Summaries; and Voting Rights. This series contains briefings, incoming correspondence, testimony, reports, clippings, articles, legislative referral memoranda, and memos. The majority of the memos are internal between the Domestic Policy Council staff, the Domestic Policy Staff and the staff of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and between the Domestic Policy Council staff and Congress. Additional materials include schedules, handwritten notes, petitions, meeting transcripts, background information on the EEOC and various events, agendas, talking points, press releases, printed material, and court records. Click here for finding aid.


Domestic Policy Council - Chris Jennings, Senior Health Policy Adviser
Domestic Policy Council - Health Security Act Series

This series contains memoranda, correspondence, reports, press releases, briefing papers, statistical data, graphs, legislative drafts, publications, and news clippings related to the Health Security Act or HSA. The Health Security Act was an effort by the Clinton Administration to provide universal health care in the form of a comprehensive national health care bill which emphasized managed care and called for the creation of regional health care alliances. This series contains material which provides a detailed analysis of the Health Security Act. A chronological subseries within this file focuses on legislative strategies to enact the HSA, as well as efforts on the part of the Clinton Administration and its supporters to counter intense opposition to the legislation from opponents in Congress and powerful interest groups. This file also contains material which examines in detail the alternatives to the Health Security Act, particularly single-payer plans and a compromise proposal from a bipartisan group of moderates in Congress called the Mainstream Coalition. Click here for finding aid.

 


Domestic Policy Council - Chris Jennings, Senior Policy Health Adviser - Subject File

As President Clinton’s Senior Health Policy Adviser, Christopher C. Jennings was charged with developing and implementing the Administration’s health care policies. Jennings was responsible for coordinating the health-related policies and procedures of numerous agencies, including the Office of Management and Budget and the Departments of Treasury, Labor, and Health and Human Services. He also was responsible for communicating and advocating the Clinton Administration’s health policies to the Congress, state and local governments, health care interest groups, medical associations, and the national media.
During his tenure, Jennings made significant contributions toward the enactment of major bipartisan health legislation including: the Kennedy - Kassebaum insurance reforms; the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act; the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP); and the Mental Health Parity Act. Prior to his appointment as Senior Health Policy Adviser, Jennings served as Senior Legislative Health Reform Adviser to the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA).Throughout the effort to develop and enact the Administration’s national health care reform bill- entitled The Health Security Act or HSA - Jennings worked closely with First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, providing information and data , briefing congressional and White House staff, preparing testimony, and arranging meetings with members of Congress and numerous health care interest groups. The Subject File series
contains memoranda, correspondence, graphs, statistical data, reports, press releases, briefing papers, handwritten notes, newspaper and magazine clippings, and publications. This series, arranged alphabetically by folder title, covers a wide variety of health-related topics. These topics include: a proposed Prescription Drug Benefit; proposals for a Patients Bill of Rights; prevention and treatment of AIDS; medical research; reform of the Food and Drug Administration; and the financing of federal health programs within the framework of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA). The Subject File contains a significant amount of material related to concerns stemming from demographic changes (specifically the aging of the “Baby Boom” generation) which threaten the future solvency of both the Medicare and Medicaid trust funds. Another large segment of this series deals with the Administration’s efforts to prevent the Republican-controlled Congress from converting the Medicaid program into a system of block grants to the states. The Clinton Administration took the position that such a move would effectively cap federal contributions to the program and result in the elimination and reduction of long-term health care coverage to millions of recipients. Click here for finding aid.

 


Kendra Brooks – Domestic Policy Council – Correspondence

The Correspondence Series is arranged alphabetically and includes incoming and outgoing correspondence pertaining to class-size reduction, the School Construction Initiative, the America Reads program, and Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans. Included in the files are letters to the President from the public and members of Congress regarding funding for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), school construction/modernization, and in support of connecting schools to the Internet. Also included are letters to Bruce Reed, Director of Domestic Policy, regarding the Meals for Achievement Act and letters to/from John Podesta, Chief of Staff, regarding funding for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU’s). The files contain letters, memos, emails, and background articles. Click here for finding aid.

 


Domestic Policy Council - Kendra Brooks, Assistant Director of Domestic Policy Printed Materials Series

The Printed Materials Series has no specific arrangement and includes titles related to national and state education goals and standards, funding for education, class-size reduction, school safety, after-school programs, reading reform, teacher quality and preparation, and student assessments. Click here for finding aid.


Domestic Policy Council - Kendra Brooks, Assistant Director of Domestic Policy Subject File Series

Kendra Brooks served as the Assistant Director of Domestic Policy for Education. The Subject Files are arranged with folder titles related to education first, followed by non-education titles and thereunder alphabetically. The files include material pertaining to charter schools, national testing, SAT preparation, school safety, school modernization/construction, affirmative action, Blue Ribbon Schools, class–size reduction, teacher quality, Limited English Proficiency (LEP), the White House Initiative on Education Excellence for Hispanic Americans, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU’s), the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and Title 1 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. The files contain incoming correspondence, reports, articles, memos, and various printed material. Other documents include background information for education events and meetings. Click here for finding aid.



Domestic Policy Council - Ira Magaziner, Electronic Commerce

From the records of the Domestic Policy Council, Ira Magaziner’s Electronic Commerce series covers policy considerations relating to internet and electronic commerce issues. Ira Magaziner served as Senior Advisor to the President for Policy Development from 1993 to 1998. Beginning in 1996, Magaziner headed up an initiative on global electronic commerce policy, resulting in the White House paper, A Framework for Global Electronic Commerce published July 1, 1997. The series includes drafts of the paper with solicited comments and input from various agencies and entities, both public and private. The files contain correspondence, reports, memos, and articles dealing with all aspects of internet issues, including copyright and intellectual property protection, encryption, domain names, and tariff and tax considerations on products sold via the internet. Magaziner and members of his staff traveled extensively throughout the world promoting the involvement of private/public partnerships in the industry of electronic commerce. The records include various travel itineraries and cables from around the world. The records contain correspondence and reports from various international organizations such as the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI). The series also contains material relating to various conferences and meetings with industry leaders on the domestic front.Click here for finding aid.


Domestic Policy Council - Carol Rasco, Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy - Meetings, Trips, Events

As the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy, Carol Rasco headed up the Domestic Policy Council (DPC) from 1993 to 1997. The records series of Carol Rasco Meetings, Trips, Events, of the DPC, details Rasco’s schedules dealing with various domestic policy issues. The series highlights the topics of discussion for scheduled meetings and events, the persons involved, and information on travel required to attend the meetings or events. Topics include health care reform, disability, employment, education, children and families, and communities. The records include memos, letters, reports, schedules, itineraries, meeting notes, and various organizational material such as flyers and pamphlets. The records series processed to date are in chronological order, dating from the beginning of the administration (January 1993) to the middle of 1994. Click here for finding aid.


Domestic Policy Council - Bruce Reed, Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy and Director - Subject File Series

The Subject File Series covers the years 1993 thru 2001 and is arranged alphabetically. The files include material pertaining to federal government fiscal year budgets, child care and child support, Earned Income Tax Credit, empowerment zones, health care, organ donations, immigration, lobbying reform, National Performance Review, political reform, race relations, taxes, urban policy, AIDS, needle exchange program, adoption, National Service, and administration accomplishments. The files contain incoming correspondence, reports and articles, memos, handwritten notes, schedules, and various printed material. Also in the Subject Files are memos to the President prepared by Bruce Reed, other Domestic Policy Council staff, and various White House and governmental agency employees, on assorted topics. Other documents include agendas and notes, talking points, testimony and briefing books, schedules, news clippings, and speeches by the President and his staff. Click here for finding aid.


Domestic Policy Council - Cynthia Rice, Special Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy - Subject File Series

During her career with the White House, Ms. Rice was active in the policy negotiations and discussions with Congress, state officials, and various private/public organizations. The records within this proposed opening cover the years 1997 to 2000 and are arranged alphabetically. Representative files include records pertaining to budget development and negotiations, childcare enhancement, child support enforcement with an emphasis on computerized state collection tools and procedures, the pursuit of employment rights for the disabled, and fatherhood development. The collection reflects a level of diversity indicative of the emerging communications revolution of the 1990s, containing faxes, electronic mail, “gray literature” from government and non-profit entities, correspondence from policy advocates, articles from various media outlets, memoranda, handwritten notes, and reports. Click here for finding aid.

 




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